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  • edited February 2 Posts: 1,177

    Interesting, here is the Perils excerpt:

    Mark Kozlelek & Jimmy Lavalle – Perils From The Sea

    By 2013 Mark Kozelek had finished honing in on the lyrical style he would release to the wider world on his next solo album Benji, something that would eventually become synonymous with his name, and remain consistent throughout the next five years – a rambling careening style of non-sequiturs and bizarrely effective brick-wall storytelling which seem to evoke feelings far beyond the confines of the narrative. Songs like ‘Gustavo’, which meander a benign relationship between Mark and a day laborer he hired, simply relays the events of the relationship, but oddly pulls at ideas of purpose, class, meaning, and nihilism anyhow.

    Where Perils From The Sea has always excelled, in my mind, over Mark’s other post-Red House Painters output is the removal of Americana and folk from the music’s composition and sonics. Jimmy Lavalle (aka The Album Leaf) instead supplants these rambling heartland stories onto chopped & screwed folk music, a folktronica reinterpretation that matches Mark Kozelek’s own deconstruction of the genre on a lyrical front. It presents Mark’s pale-faced stories in a way that doesn’t feel disingenuous to his disinterest in conventional songwriting, instead presenting it outright.

  • Posts: 1,177

    And here is DCH:

    Red House Painters – Down Colorful Hill

    Red House Painters have, in some ways, begun to fall into the shadow of frontman Mark Kozelek as he continues to tear up the indie press as the sole member of his new project Sun Kil Moon. A press presence that has been both astoundingly good and astoundingly bad, but before Benji, and before he told War On Drugs to “suck his cock”, he fronted one of the most important indie bands of the 90s, one that never really made it beyond the record shop floor.

    Their debut album Down Colorful Hill is like the conceptual delivery of the entire American folk songwriter pantheon, as if James Taylor and Nick Drake were let loose onto the unsuspecting 90s with an electric guitar and a burning passion for the heartland. Kozelek speaks with his trademark unfurling monotone, a voice that seems to keep hinting and hinting at something that never comes, a deeply ingrained longing for something beyond words. The band behind Mark is what makes the work seem so much more infinite and substantial though. They lumber and snarl with their best twisted impression of the American rock canon all played at a third the speed, slowing-down and reverbing-out folk rock to the point of dreamscapes and panic.

    Lingering like shadows in ghost towns, and between ideas of America’s broken unions, the band’s trademark silver print album covers would become as iconic as the music, codifying a visual presence to the sounds themselves. Sonic and visual work that would solidify underground music’s notions of American degradation and rot through the aged iconography of its Midwest. The stark black and white cover of Down Colorful Hill is particularly arresting, with the smattering of blood just above newly changed sheets; history lingering over our safest places.

  • Currently checking some things from this out. Finally gave me the push to check out Cat Power which I somehow never did...very impressed.

    Haven't heard of some of the artists mentioned in the article, what are the must-hears in some of your honorable opinions?

  • edited February 3 Posts: 1,177

    It didn’t make the list but under the folk/Americana category I highly recommend the first Jesse Sykes album — Reckless Burning. Her others are good too but this is the most slowcore.

  • edited February 3 Posts: 1,177

    The Hope Sandoval is prettty good too.

  • edited February 5 Posts: 689

    Great article, but. . . are my eyes deceiving me, or is there no mention of Idaho? How can Year After Year get overlooked in a slowcore guide? I love the main pic that starts off the guide. I love the Rollercoaster artwork so much that I bought the LP (I don't own a turntable) just to frame the sleeve & that inner. Seeing that image alone reminds me how much I love RHP.

    @DonaldDuckKooKim have you checked out Bluetile Lounge? Their 2 albums, Lowercase and Half Cut are essential in my opinion. They would have been another good shout for the guide.

    Another band who just came to mind but aren't often lumped in with the usual Slowcore bands who get wheeled out in these articles, is Acetone. I only discovered them myself a couple of months back. I bought their 'Acetone 1992-2001' release solely on the description in Piccadilly Records' AOTY booklet, reissues of the year section, without hearing a note of their music. One of those rare times when you somehow just know you're gonna like something. Its a random mix of songs from across their career and unreleased songs. Quite honestly if I hadn't read the booklet, I doubt I'd have even noticed this was the case. Of course to someone who knows the band's output well, this may seem a bit jumbled up, but to me, a newcomer, its remarkably coherent and at 16 songs, never seems too long at any point. In fact it goes quickly. Describing music with words isn't my strong point, but 'sublime' comes to mind. I find the whole thing mesmerising. Can't remember when I was last floored like this by a new-to-me old band. I will enjoy delving deeper into them but this really is a great introduction to the band. Of course, as with any band brought to an abrupt premature end due to suicide of a band member, it is tinged with sadness. For anyone who hasn't heard of them, I couldn't recommend 'Acetone 1992-2001' more highly. It hit me like I imagine RHP's Retrospective hitting someone who is new to RHP.

  • edited February 6 Posts: 28

    @DonaldDuckKooKim said:
    Currently checking some things from this out. Finally gave me the push to check out Cat Power which I somehow never did...very impressed.

    Haven't heard of some of the artists mentioned in the article, what are the must-hears in some of your honorable opinions?

    The Giles Corey album mentioned is phenomenal

    The guy behind GC has another band called “Have A Nice Life” which is also well worth your time

  • edited February 6 Posts: 380

    Fuckin' cosigned on GC/HANL/Black Wing and any other project Dan Barrett is related to. Also a new Have a Nice Life album has been confirmed for this year.

    A lot of good albums mentioned in this article. Carissa's Wierd, Julien Baker, Songs: Ohia, all great choices.

  • Posts: 28

    @Drop said:
    Fuckin' cosigned on GC/HANL/Black Wing and any other project Dan Barrett is related to. Also a new Have a Nice Life album has been confirmed for this year.

    A lot of good albums mentioned in this article. Carissa's Wierd, Julien Baker, Songs: Ohia, all great choices.

    I'm seeing HANL live in Brooklyn in a few months. Can't fuckin wait

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